Oil Together Now: Who’s really playing politics in the classroom?

Alberta Education Minister Adriana LaGrange is very concerned that teachers in classrooms across the province are turning students into anti-oil zealots. Her evidence? Two multiple-choice questions from a grade 10 Social Studies test, reportedly sent by a parent, that appear to cast aspersions on oilsands development (the offending options have…
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Canada’s lackluster performance under CETA should be a lesson

In July, several members of Parliament—including NDP and Green leaders Jagmeet Singh and Elizabeth May—sent a letter to French legislators urging them not to ratify the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). “We agree that trade between our countries and continents is important,” it read. “However, we believe in…
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Envisioning a progressive trade agenda for the 21st century

The extraordinary surge in popular support for expanding public health care, a “Green New Deal” and other progressive policies demonstrates a powerful public appetite for meaningful social change. Decades of neoliberal austerity and “the market made me do it” politics, which boosted inequality in most countries, have also created pent-up…
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Pharmacare costing: How to make universal, single-payer pharmacare work for households and employers

  Yesterday’s announcement from the The Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare, led by Dr. Eric Hoskins, was applauded by organizations and researchers across Canada who have long advocated for the introduction of a universal, single-payer pharmacare system. Journalists at the event, however, seemed to be focused on…
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The New NAFTA is a missed opportunity for gender equality

The recent renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement presented a unique opportunity to rethink the dominant model for governing international trade and investment. At the outset of the “New NAFTA” talks in August 2017, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland outlined the government’s priorities under the umbrella of a…
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Why high U.S. drug prices matter to Canada

In the mid-1970s the average monthly cost of a cancer drug in the United States was about $100. By 1995 that cost had crept up to about $1,800 per month and today it is over $10,000. Similarly, while drugs for multiple sclerosis introduced in the mid-1990s cost about $8,000 per…
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From fighting back to fighting forward: Strategizing across Canadian movements for jobs, justice, equality and the climate

In an increasingly chaotic world characterized by deep inequality and growing disillusionment with governments, public institutions and evidence, progressive movements offering a compelling and hopeful narrative for change have never been more important. Social justice, environmental sustainability and social solidarity are the keys to an inclusive, productive future for people…
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Time to end the chill effect on Canadian charities

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice has confirmed that the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) crackdown on charitable political activity has been an arbitrary and unjustified infringement upon freedom of expression. It’s time for the federal government to act swiftly to close the book on a dark time in Canada’s democratic…
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