Tiering up over tuition fees?

  This fall, tuition fees in Canada are set to increase by 2.8% to a weighted average of $6,373. That’s a smaller increase than in previous years, but (as always) averages can mask some important details: in this case, the plethora of options provinces are pursuing to address the optics…
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Progress is about solutions, not scapegoats

If anything’s become clear while watching the star-spangled spectacle unfold south of the border, it’s this: nature—in this case, human nature—abhors a vacuum. The context is evident. Growing inequality. Gutted infrastructure. The rise of the precariat. And in the absence of a clearly articulated plan that will address the disillusionment,…
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Onward and (Next) Upward

There is no question that disillusionment with the electoral process and democratic institutions is approaching a breaking point, on an international scale, and manifesting itself in radically different ways, from deeply progressive to dangerously regressive. We saw it in Greece (when Syriza was elected on a platform based on an…
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Pain by Numbers: The distributional impacts of federal funding for post-secondary education

The recently-released PBO report, Federal Spending on Postsecondary Education, is a treasure trove of information about education funding, tuition fees, savings schemes and tax credits going back to 2004-2005 and projecting forward to 2020. It’s also vindication for a number of organizations that have been pointing out how the high…
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The fickle mantle of innovation

Innovation™ has become both a rebranding exercise and an apology for a host of regressive corporate practices that look suspiciously like business as usual. But let’s be clear: there is nothing unconventional or remotely innovative about corporations that rationalize exploitation—of a workforce, of political connections, of rules that exist to…
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Avoiding the trap of high hopes and low standards

On October 19th, after the longest campaign in recent history, the Liberals under Justin Trudeau were elected to a majority government in a crimson haze of Trudeaumania 2.0; Jack-Layton-esque hope/change/optimism branding; and anti-Harper sentiment (or, perhaps more accurately, fear of what a re-elected Conservative government would mean) as lifelong Liberals,…
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